THE CORPORATE LIBRARY

Related Party Transactions and Outside Related Director Information

TCF Financial Corporation (TCB)

3/8/2006 Proxy Information

Mr. Evans retired as an executive from TCF Financial and TCF National Bank effective January 1998.

Mr. Cooper served as and Chief Executive Officer of TCF Financial from 1987 until December 2005. Mr. Cooper was Chief Executive Officer of TCF National Bank, a wholly-owned national bank subsidiary of TCF Financial, until 1993.

During 2003-05, TCF had certain transactions or business relationships with certain Directors, all of which the Board of Directors determined to be not material, including but not limited to the following:

The firm of Kaplan, Strangis and Kaplan, P.A. provides legal services to TCF (including its subsidiaries). Total fees received by Kaplan, Strangis and Kaplan, P.A. in each of the years 2003-05 were not large enough to require disclosure under regulations of the SEC. Ralph Strangis is a member of the firm of Kaplan, Strangis and Kaplan, P.A. During 2003-05, CTS Corporate Travel Solutions (“CTS”) provided certain travel-related services to TCF (including its subsidiaries). Grace Strangis, the spouse of Ralph Strangis, is an officer, director and minority stockholder of CTS. Payments to CTS in each of the years 2003 and 2005 were not large enough to require disclosure under regulations of the SEC, both separately and when combined with payments to and revenues of Kaplan, Strangis and Kaplan, P.A. except that in the year 2004, CTS received payments from TCF of $222,200 for travel-related services, which was 6.5% of CTS’ revenue. When combined with payments to and revenues of Kaplan, Strangis and Kaplan, P.A., payments to CTS in 2004 were not large enough to require disclosure under regulations of the SEC. The Board of Directors determined in 2005 that the payments to CTS in 2004 were not material and did not compromise Mr. Strangis’ independence as a Director because the amount was not significant and the percentage increase was due to ordinary fluctuations in the travel business volume of CTS.

Mr. Strangis was an organizer of Cooper State Bank, a state bank organized under the laws of Ohio, of which Mr. Cooper is controlling shareholder. Mr. Strangis, Mr. Burwell, Ms. Goldberg, Mr. Schwalbach, and certain members of TCF management are shareholders in the Bank. Mr. Winslow and one other member of TCF’s management are directors of Cooper State Bank. The Board determined in 2005 that Mr. Strangis’ role as an organizer and his investment in Cooper State Bank was not material and did not compromise his independence as a Director because these transactions are not with TCF; Cooper State Bank will not be a competitor of TCF (its market area does not overlap TCF’s); and Mr. Cooper has retired as TCF’s Chief Executive Officer.

In 2003-05, TCF Bank or its subsidiaries had various commercial lending relationships with companies associated with Mr. Bieber, Mr. Burwell, Mr. Eggemeyer, Mr. Scherer, and Mr. Schwalbach. These loans are of a type which is not prohibited under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the loan amounts are not prohibited by the NYSE Rule, and the amounts paid are not in excess of five percent of TCF’s, or the Director’s businesses’ consolidated gross revenues for the last full fiscal year. All such loans were made in the ordinary course of business on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with other persons and did not involve more than the normal risk of collectability or present other unfavorable features. In 2003-05, TCF Bank or its subsidiaries also had outstanding residential mortgage loans, deposit accounts (including overdraft lines of credit) and/or other retail consumer banking relationships with certain Directors and executive officers or family members of Directors and executive officers which were made in the ordinary course of business and on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with the general public, and did not involve more than the normal risk of collectability or present other unfavorable features.

3/16/2005 Proxy Information

The firm of Kaplan, Strangis and Kaplan, P.A. provides legal services to TCF (including its subsidiaries). Total fees received by Kaplan, Strangis and Kaplan, P.A. in each of the years 2002-04 were not large enough to require disclosure under regulations of the SEC. Ralph Strangis is a member of the firm of Kaplan, Strangis and Kaplan, P.A. During 2002-04, CTS Corporate Travel Solutions (“CTS”) provided certain travel-related services to TCF (including its subsidiaries). Grace Strangis, the spouse of Ralph Strangis, is an officer, director and minority stockholder of CTS. Payments to CTS in each of the years 2002-03 were not large enough to require disclosure under regulations of the SEC, both separately and when combined with payments to and revenues of Kaplan, Strangis and Kaplan, P.A. In the year 2004, CTS received payments from TCF of $222,200 for travel-related services, which was 6.5% of CTS’ revenue. When combined with payments to and revenues of Kaplan, Strangis and Kaplan, P.A., payments to CTS in 2004 were not large enough to require disclosure under regulations of the SEC. The Board of Directors determined that the payments to CTS were not material and do not compromise Mr. Strangis’ independence as a Director because the amount is not significant and the percentage increase is due to ordinary fluctuations in the travel business volume of CTS.

Mr. Strangis is an organizer of Cooper State Bank, a state bank being organized under the laws of Ohio, of which Mr. Cooper will be a controlling shareholder. Mr. Strangis and certain members of TCF management and board are expected to invest funds and become shareholders in the Bank, and certain members of TCF management are expected to be directors of the Bank. The Board has determined that Mr. Strangis’ role as an organizer and his proposed investment in Cooper State Bank is not material and does not compromise his independence as a Director because these transactions are not with TCF, Cooper State Bank will not be a competitor of TCF (its market area does not overlap TCF’s), and Mr. Cooper is retiring as TCF’s Chief Executive Officer.

In 2002-04, TCF Bank or its subsidiaries had various commercial lending relationships with companies associated with Mr. Bieber, Mr. Burwell, Mr. Eggemeyer, Mr. Scherer, and Mr. Schwalbach. These loans are of a type which is not prohibited under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the loan amounts are not prohibited by the NYSE Rule, and the amounts and details of the loans are not required to be disclosed in the proxy statement under regulations of the SEC. All such loans were made in the ordinary course of business on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with other persons and did not involve more than the normal risk of collectability or present other unfavorable features. In 2002-04, TCF Bank or its subsidiaries also had outstanding residential mortgage loans, deposit accounts (including overdraft lines of credit) and/or other retail consumer banking relationships with certain Directors and executive officers or family members of Directors and executive officers which were made in the ordinary course of business and on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with the general public, and did not involve more than the normal risk of collectability or present other unfavorable features.

3/17/2004 Proxy Information

Thomas A. Cusick was an executive of TCF Financial until December 2002.

Robert E. Evans was an executive of TCF Financial and TCF National Bank until January 1998.

Mr. Strangis is a member of the law firm of Kaplan, Strangis and Kaplan, P.A., which provided legal services to TCF Financial (including its subsidiaries) during 2003. Fees paid to the law firm did not meet the threshold required for proxy statement disclosure under regulations of the SEC and were not disqualifying amounts under the NYSE Rule. TCF Financial believes that the fees charged by this law firm for the services provided were at market rates and were not affected by Mr. Strangis’ position as a Director.

In 2003, TCF National Bank or its subsidiaries had various commercial lending relationships with companies associated with Mr. Bieber, Mr. Eggemeyer, Mr. Schwalbach, Mr. Burwell and Mr. Scherer. These are a type of loans not prohibited under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the loan amounts are not prohibited by the NYSE Rule, and the amounts and details of the loans are not required to be disclosed in the proxy statement under regulations of the SEC. All such loans were made in the ordinary course of business on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with other persons and did not involve more than the normal risk of collectability or present other unfavorable features. In 2003, TCF National Bank or its subsidiaries also had outstanding residential mortgage loans, deposit accounts (including overdraft lines of credit) and/or other retail consumer banking relationships with certain Directors and executive officers or family members of Directors and executive officers which were made in the ordinary course of business and on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with the general public, and did not involve more than the normal risk of collectability or present other unfavorable features.

3/19/2003 Proxy Information

The firm of Kaplan, Strangis and Kaplan, P.A. provided legal services to TCF Financial (including its subsidiaries) during 2002. Mr. Strangis is a member of the law firm of Kaplan, Strangis and Kaplan, P.A. Fees paid to the law firm did not exceed 5% of its gross revenues (or of TCF Financial's gross revenues). TCF Financial believes that the fees charged by this law firm for the services provided were at market rates and were not affected by Mr. Strangis' position as a director.

In 2002 TCF National Bank, a subsidiary of TCF Financial, had various corporate term loans, corporate lines of credit, commercial real estate loans and a letter of credit outstanding to companies associated with Mr. Bieber, Mr. Schwalbach, and Mr. Burwell. All loans to Mr. Bieber's, Mr. Schwalbach's, and Mr. Burwell's companies were made in the ordinary course of business on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with other persons and did not involve more than the normal risk of collectability or present other unfavorable features. During 2002, TCF National Bank and/or its wholly owned subsidiary mortgage corporation, TCF Mortgage Corporation, had outstanding residential mortgage loans to certain family members of directors and executive officers. All such loans were made in the ordinary course of business and on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with the general public, and did not involve more than the normal risk of collectability or present other unfavorable features. During part of 2002, TCF Financial had certain loans outstanding to accounts of executives in the Executive Deferred Compensation Plan and to directors' accounts in the Directors Deferred Compensation Plan. These loans were fully repaid in 2002 and are no longer outstanding. See pages 8 and 14 for details. In 2002 a subsidiary of TCF Financial Corporation, Winthrop Resources Corporation, had a direct financing lease with Castle Creek Capital LLC, a company affiliated with John M. Eggemeyer III. The lease was made in the ordinary course of business and on substantially the same terms as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with the general public and did not involve more than the normal risk of collectability or present other unfavorable features. The largest balance outstanding on the lease in 2002 was $134,237. The outstanding balance on December 31, 2002 was $63,617. The lease does not carry a specific interest rate.