THE CORPORATE LIBRARY

Related Party Transactions and Outside Related Director Information

Symantec Corporation (SYMC)

8/1/2005 Proxy Information

Gary L. Bloom joined Symantec in July 2005 as a result of Symantec’s merger with VERITAS Software Corporation, and has served as Vice-Chairman of the Board of Directors and President since the merger.

V. Paul Unruh, David Roux and Michael Brown were appointed to the Board of Directors in July 2005 following the merger with VERITAS.

David Roux was appointed to the Board of Directors in July 2005 following the merger with VERITAS.

Michael Brown was appointed to the Board of Directors in July 2005 following the merger with VERITAS.

Symantec has adopted a relocation program to assist senior managers required to relocate in connection with their employment duties. Under this program, a relocation company typically purchases the former residence from the relocating senior manager and arranges for a buyer to purchase the home — in practice this may occur immediately after the purchase. In the event that the residence is sold by the relocation company at a loss, or if the residence cannot be sold, Symantec is responsible for compensating the relocation company for the differential. Pursuant to that program, in March 2003, Symantec engaged the services of a relocation company to purchase and sell the former residence of John G. Schwarz, President, on behalf of Symantec. The relocation company purchased the home from Mr. Schwarz in June 2003 and realized a loss of $27,500 on the subsequent repurchase, which amount was covered by Symantec. In February 2004, Symantec engaged the services of the relocation company in connection with the June 2004 sale of the former residence of Thomas W. Kendra, Senior Vice President, Worldwide Sales. The relocation company assisted in the sale of Mr. Kendra’s home to a third party, which did not result in any gain or loss to Symantec.

Symantec has adopted provisions in its certificate of incorporation and by-laws that limit the liability of its directors and provide for indemnification of its officers and directors to the full extent permitted under Delaware law. Under Symantec’s Certificate of Incorporation, and as permitted under the Delaware General Corporation Law, directors are not liable to Symantec or its stockholders for monetary damages arising from a breach of their fiduciary duty of care as directors, including such conduct during a merger or tender offer. In addition, Symantec has entered into separate indemnification agreements with its directors and officers that could require Symantec, among other things, to indemnify them against certain liabilities that may arise by reason of their status or service as directors or officers. Such provisions do not, however, affect liability for any breach of a director’s duty of loyalty to Symantec or its stockholders, liability for acts or omissions not in good faith or involving intentional misconduct or knowing violations of law, liability for transactions in which the director derived an improper personal benefit or liability for the payment of a dividend in violation of Delaware law. Such limitation of liability also does not limit a director’s liability for violation of, or otherwise relieve Symantec or its directors from the necessity of complying with, federal or state securities laws or affect the availability of equitable remedies such as injunctive relief or rescission.

7/30/2004 Proxy Information

Symantec has adopted a relocation program to assist senior managers required to relocate in connection with their employment duties. Pursuant to that program, in March 2003, Symantec engaged the services of a relocation company to purchase and sell the former residence of John Schwarz, President and Chief Operating Officer, on behalf of Symantec. The relocation company purchased the home from Mr. Schwarz in June 2003 for $1,297,500. The relocation company ultimately sold the home in August 2003 for $1,270,000. Symantec covered the realized loss of $27,500 on the sale of the house.

Symantec has adopted provisions in its certificate of incorporation and by-laws that limit the liability of its directors and provide for indemnification of its officers and directors to the full extent permitted under Delaware law. Under Symantec’s Certificate of Incorporation, and as permitted under the Delaware General Corporation Law, directors are not liable to Symantec or its stockholders for monetary damages arising from a breach of their fiduciary duty of care as directors, including such conduct during a merger or tender offer. In addition, Symantec has entered into separate indemnification agreements with its directors and officers that could require Symantec, among other things, to indemnify them against certain liabilities that may arise by reason of their status or service as directors or officers. Such provisions do not, however, affect liability for any breach of a director’s duty of loyalty to Symantec or its stockholders, liability for acts or omissions not in good faith or involving intentional misconduct or knowing violations of law, liability for transactions in which the director derived an improper personal benefit or liability for the payment of a dividend in violation of Delaware law. Such limitation of liability also does not limit a director’s liability for violation of, or otherwise relieve Symantec or its directors from the necessity of complying with, federal or state securities laws or affect the availability of equitable remedies such as injunctive relief or rescission.

7/18/2003 Proxy Information

Symantec has adopted a relocation program to assist senior managers required to relocate in connection with their employment duties. Pursuant to that program, in March 2003, Symantec engaged the services of a relocation company to purchase and sell the former residence of John Schwarz, President and Chief Operating Officer, on behalf of the company. Under this arrangement, Symantec is responsible for any decrease in the market value of the property subsequent to its purchase from Mr. Schwarz, payment of the expenses associated with the subsequent sale of the property, and for payment of a service fee to the relocation company.

In May 1999, the company loaned $1,400,000 to John W. Thompson, the company’s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, in connection with the acquisition of a residential property following Mr. Thompson’s relocation from Connecticut to California. The loan was evidenced by a one-year secured promissory note that bore interest at 4.9% per annum and was renewed twice. The interest on the note was forgiven by the company and the note was repaid in full in May 2002.

Symantec has adopted provisions in its certificate of incorporation and by-laws that limit the liability of its directors and provide for indemnification of its officers and directors to the full extent permitted under Delaware law. Under Symantec’s Certificate of Incorporation, and as permitted under the Delaware General Corporation Law, directors are not liable to Symantec or its stockholders for monetary damages arising from a breach of their fiduciary duty of care as directors, including such conduct during a merger or tender offer. In addition, Symantec has entered into separate indemnification agreements with its directors and officers that could require Symantec, among other things, to indemnify them against certain liabilities that may arise by reason of their status or service as directors or officers. Such provisions do not, however, affect liability for any breach of a director’s duty of loyalty to Symantec or its stockholders, liability for acts or omissions not in good faith or involving intentional misconduct or knowing violations of law, liability for transactions in which the director derived an improper personal benefit or liability for the payment of a dividend in violation of Delaware law. Such limitation of liability also does not limit a director’s liability for violation of, or otherwise relieve Symantec or its directors from the necessity of complying with, federal or state securities laws or affect the availability of equitable remedies such as injunctive relief or rescission.