THE CORPORATE LIBRARY

Related Party Transactions and Outside Related Director Information

Starbucks Corporation (SBUX)

12/16/2005 Proxy Information

From January 2000 to June 2005, Mr. Maffei was chairman and chief executive officer of 360networks Corporation, and was chief executive officer when 360networks and many of its Canadian and U.S. operating subsidiaries filed for voluntary bankruptcy protection in June 2001. 360networks emerged from bankruptcy in October 2002 and Mr. Maffei remained chief executive officer until June 2005.

In April 2001, Mr. Schultz and a group of investors organized as The Basketball Club of Seattle, LLC (“The Basketball Club”) purchased the franchises for the Seattle Supersonics (which later changed its name to the Seattle Sonics) and the Seattle Storm basketball teams. Mr. Schultz holds a controlling ownership interest in The Basketball Club. The Basketball Club assumed pre-existing Team Sponsorship Agreements between the former owners of the franchises and the Company. During fiscal 2005, the Company entered into a new Sponsorship Agreement with respect to sponsorship of the Seattle Sonics. The Company is currently negotiating a new agreement for sponsorship of the Seattle Storm. Pursuant to such agreements, the Company paid The Basketball Club an aggregate of $816,892 in fiscal 2005.

On February 11, 2005, the Company entered into a letter agreement with Mr. Schultz and the trustee for the Schultz Irrevocable Trust and the Howard D. Schultz Irrevocable Trust to terminate split-dollar life insurance agreements with each of the trusts and the underlying life insurance policies. To replace the loss of the benefit to Mr. Schultz under the agreements, the Company agreed to compensate Mr. Schultz $236,250 annually, as other compensation to be used by him to acquire a like benefit, for so long as he remains a full-time employee of the Company. This amount equals the Company’s annual premium obligation as of the date of the agreement with an adjustment for related federal income tax consequences.

Mr. Behar, a member of the Board of Directors who had previously retired as an executive of the Company in 1999, returned to serve as the Company’s president, North America from September 2001 through December 2002. Mr. Behar and the Company entered into an agreement in May 2003 pursuant to which Mr. Behar deferred $1.8 million in compensation earned by him as president, North America, and agreed to serve as an advisor to the Company for a salary of $25,000 per year. In December 2005, Mr. Behar and the Company amended the agreement to provide that the Company (i) will pay Mr. Behar a lump sum of approximately $1.1 million, which represents the full amount of his previously unpaid deferred compensation, (ii) continue to employ Mr. Behar as an advisor at an annual salary of $25,000 through October 31, 2010, and (iii) so long as Mr. Behar remains employed under the agreement, grant Mr. Behar an annual award under the 2005 Key Employee Plan having a fair value of $105,000 on the grant date. Awards under the 2005 Key Employee Plan that are subject to vesting will vest in full on the first anniversary of the grant date if Mr. Behar remains employed at that time and, if in the form of stock options, will have an exercise price equal to the fair market value of the Common Stock on the grant date. If Mr. Behar dies before the end of the term, his spouse (or estate, if his spouse does not survive him) will be entitled to the full amount that Mr. Behar would have received through the full term of the agreement.

10/12/2004 8K Information

Mr. Orin C. Smith served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Starbucks Corporation from June 2000 thru March 2005.

12/10/2004 Proxy Information

During fiscal 2003 and 2002, the Company chartered an aircraft operated by Devon Air Holdings, LLC (“Devon Air”), a limited liability company wholly-owned by Mr. Schultz, the Company’s chairman of the Board of Directors and chief global strategist, for executive business travel. The Company paid $133,810 and $475,344 in fiscal 2003 and 2002, respectively, for the charter of this aircraft, based on a discounted rate for actual hours flown.

During fiscal 2003, the Company entered into a series of agreements with Canarsie Holdings, LLC (“Canarsie”), a limited liability company wholly-owned by Mr. Schultz and his wife. Canarsie operated the aircraft formerly operated by Devon Air until May 2004 when it was sold. Pursuant to an Aircraft Interchange Agreement dated as of October 28, 2002, each of the Company and Canarsie agreed to lease its aircraft to the other on an as-needed basis at prescribed rates with monthly reconciliations of amounts owed. Based on differences in hours flown and cost per flight hour for each aircraft, Canarsie paid the Company net amounts of $0 and $23,400 during fiscal 2004 and 2003, respectively, before applicable taxes under this agreement. The Company and Canarsie agreed to provide use of each other’s aircraft on a time-sharing basis under Time-Sharing Agreements dated October 28, 2002. Pursuant to these agreements, during fiscal 2004 and 2003 the Company paid Canarsie $103,200 and $77,000, respectively, before applicable taxes for the use of Canarsie’s aircraft, and Canarsie did not use the Company’s aircraft and so made no payments to the Company. Pursuant to a lease agreement dated as of April 21, 2003, between the Company and Canarsie, the Company leased to Canarsie the use of a portion of an airplane hangar with office space for the purposes of storing, repairing and maintaining an airplane owned or leased by Canarsie. Canarsie paid the Company rent of $7,000 per month for the use of this leased space, and paid $49,000 and $84,000 in rent to the Company during fiscal 2004 and fiscal 2003, respectively. Canarsie and the Company also equally shared the cost of an office manager for aircraft operations and an aircraft cleaner. Canarsie paid the Company an aggregate of $39,853 and $36,228 during fiscal 2004 and fiscal 2003, respectively, for these personnel costs. The Company and Canarsie also shared certain expenses related to pilot training, with Canarsie paying the Company $8,250 during fiscal 2003 for its share of those expenses. Due to the sale of the aircraft operated by Canarsie in May 2004, the Company does not expect to have any further business dealings with Canarsie.

In April 2001, Mr. Schultz and a group of investors organized as The Basketball Club of Seattle, LLC (the “Basketball Club”) purchased the franchises for The Seattle Supersonics and The Seattle Storm basketball teams. Upon such purchase, the Basketball Club assumed pre-existing Team Sponsorship Agreements between the former owners and the Company. Pursuant to such agreements, the Company paid the Basketball Club and those franchises an aggregate of $800,164, $777,884 and $739,593 in fiscal 2004, 2003 and 2002, respectively. Mr. Schultz holds a controlling ownership interest in the Basketball Club.

The Company establishes certain compensation arrangements with its executive officers at the time of hire. The arrangements include starting salary, bonus eligibility, initial stock option grants and relocation packages, where appropriate. In addition, most of such arrangements specify that the executive officer will receive an amount equal to twelve months of base salary as severance in the event that he or she is terminated for any reason other than cause. Neither Mr. Schultz nor Mr. Smith has such an arrangement with the Company.

Mr. Behar, a member of the Board of Directors who had previously retired as an executive of the Company in 1999, returned to serve as the Company’s president, North America from September 2001 through December 2002. Mr. Behar deferred compensation of (1) $546,154, representing the unpaid portion of Mr. Behar’s fiscal 2002 base salary, (2) $623,872, representing Mr. Behar’s fiscal 2002 bonus, and (3) $629,974 representing income earned by Mr. Behar during fiscal 2003. In May 2003, Mr. Behar and the Company entered into an eight-year agreement (which superseded an earlier agreement of December 2001) that describes how the Company will pay Mr. Behar these deferred amounts, as well as an additional $25,000 per year for Mr. Behar’s services as an advisor to the Company. From November 1, 2002 until October 31, 2010 (the “Term”), Mr. Behar will be paid bi-weekly an amount that annualizes to $250,000 per year.

In the event that Mr. Behar dies before the Term expires, the Company will pay, or cause an insurer to pay, Mr. Behar’s surviving spouse (or Mr. Behar’s estate if his wife does not survive him) a single sum equal to the unpaid amount Mr. Behar would have received through the full Term of the agreement. The Company may terminate the agreement for cause and Mr. Behar may terminate the agreement at any time by providing the Company with written notice of his resignation. A termination of the May 2003 agreement, regardless of the reason for the termination, does not affect the Company’s obligation to pay Mr. Behar income he has already earned, but deferred under the agreement. Mr. Behar and his spouse are eligible to receive employee benefits in accordance with the terms of the Company’s medical, dental, vision and savings plans for the Term of the agreement. Mr. Behar is not eligible to participate in the NED Option Plan until he ceases to be employed by the Company for at least a year, but in the discretion of the Compensation Committee, Mr. Behar is eligible to receive stock option grants under the Key Employee Plan.

1/22/2004 Proxy Information

During fiscal 2003, 2002 and 2001, the Company chartered an aircraft operated by Devon Air Holdings, LLC (“Devon Air”), a limited liability company wholly-owned by Mr. Schultz, the Company’s chairman of the Board of Directors and chief global strategist, for executive business travel. The Company paid $133,810, $475,344 and $356,697 in fiscal 2003, 2002 and 2001, respectively, for the charter of this aircraft, based on a discounted rate for actual hours flown.

During fiscal 2003, the Company entered into a series of agreements with Canarsie Holdings, LLC (“Canarsie”), a limited liability company wholly-owned by Mr. Schultz and his wife. Canarsie now operates the aircraft formerly operated by Devon Air. Pursuant to an Aircraft Interchange Agreement dated as of October 28, 2002, each of the Company and Canarsie agreed to lease its aircraft to the other on an as-needed basis at prescribed rates with monthly reconciliations of amounts owed. Based on differences in hours flown and cost per flight hour for each aircraft, Canarsie paid the Company a net amount of $23,400 before applicable taxes under this agreement during fiscal 2003. The Company and Canarsie also have agreed to provide use of each other’s aircraft on a time-sharing basis under Time-Sharing Agreements dated October 28, 2002. Pursuant to these agreements, during fiscal 2003 the Company paid Canarsie $77,000 before applicable taxes for the use of Canarsie’s aircraft, and Canarsie did not use the Company’s aircraft and so made no payments to the Company. Pursuant to an agreement dated October 4, 2002, the Company agreed to loan to Canarsie on a temporary basis flight crew members employed by the Company from time to time upon the request of Canarsie and to the extent the crew members are not otherwise needed by the Company. Under the terms of this agreement, Canarsie pays to the Company $250 per flight hour per temporary flight crew member plus all out-of-pocket expenses incurred by temporary crew members related to their service on Canarsie flights. Pursuant to a lease agreement dated as of April 21, 2003, between the Company and Canarsie, the Company leased to Canarsie the use of a portion of an airplane hangar with office space for the purposes of storing, repairing and maintaining an airplane owned or leased by Canarsie. Canarsie pays the Company rent of $7,000 per month for the use of this leased space, and paid a total of $84,000 in rent to the Company during fiscal 2003. Canarsie and the Company also equally shared the cost of an office manager for aircraft operations and an aircraft cleaner. Canarsie paid the Company an aggregate of $36,228 during fiscal 2003 for these personnel costs. The Company and Canarsie also shared certain expenses related to pilot training, with Canarsie paying the Company $8,250 for its share of those expenses.

In April 2001, Mr. Schultz and a group of investors organized as The Basketball Club of Seattle, LLC (the “Basketball Club”) purchased the franchises for The Seattle Supersonics and The Seattle Storm basketball teams. Upon such purchase, the Basketball Club assumed pre-existing Team Sponsorship Agreements between the former owners and the Company. Pursuant to such agreements, the Company paid the Basketball Club and those franchises an aggregate of $777,884, $739,593 and $299,020 in fiscal 2003, 2002 and 2001, respectively. Mr. Schultz holds a controlling ownership interest in the Basketball Club.

The Company establishes certain compensation arrangements with its executive officers at the time of hire. The arrangements include starting salary, bonus eligibility, initial stock option grants and relocation packages, where appropriate. In addition, most of such arrangements specify that the executive officer will receive an amount equal to twelve months of base salary as severance in the event that he or she is terminated for any reason other than cause. Neither Mr. Schultz nor Mr. Smith has such an arrangement with the Company.

Mr. Behar, a member of the Board of Directors who had previously retired as an executive of the Company in 1999, returned to serve as the Company’s president, North America from September 2001 through December 2002. Mr. Behar deferred compensation of (1) $546,154, representing the unpaid portion of Mr. Behar’s fiscal 2002 base salary, (2) $623,872, representing Mr. Behar’s fiscal 2002 bonus, and (3) $629,974 representing income earned by Mr. Behar during fiscal 2003. In May 2003, Mr. Behar and the Company entered into an eight-year agreement (which superceded an earlier agreement of December 2001) that describes how the Company will pay Mr. Behar these deferred amounts, as well as an additional $25,000 per year for Mr. Behar’s services as an advisor to the Company. From November 1, 2002 until October 31, 2010 (the “Term”), Mr. Behar will be paid bi-weekly a base salary that annualizes to $250,000 per year.

In the event that Mr. Behar dies before the Term expires, the Company will pay, or cause an insurer to pay, Mr. Behar’s surviving spouse (or Mr. Behar’s estate if his wife does not survive him) a single sum equal to the unpaid salary Mr. Behar would have received through the full Term of the agreement. The Company may terminate the agreement for cause and Mr. Behar may terminate the agreement at any time by providing the Company with written notice of his resignation. A termination of the May 2003 agreement, regardless of the reason for the termination, does not affect the Company’s obligation to compensate Mr. Behar for income he has already earned, but paid to him as deferred compensation under the agreement. Mr. Behar and his spouse are eligible to receive employee benefits in accordance with the terms of the Company’s medical, dental, vision and savings plans for the Term of the agreement. Mr. Behar is not eligible to participate in the NED Option Plan until he ceases to be employed by the Company for at least a year, but in the discretion of the Compensation Committee, Mr. Behar is eligible to receive stock option grants under the Key Employee Plan.

Until January 1, 2003, Mr. Prentice, a member of the Company’s Board of Directors, was a member of the board of directors of PlayNetwork, Inc. (“PlayNetwork”), and was also affiliated with Chartwell Capital Investors II, L.P., which owns approximately 30% of PlayNetwork. Effective January 1, 2003, Mr. Prentice resigned from the board of directors of, terminated any affiliation with, and divested himself of any economic interest in, PlayNetwork, Inc. Starbucks purchases music services for its retail stores from PlayNetwork and, during the period in which Mr. Prentice was affiliated with PlayNetwork, paid $658,502, $2,954,808 and $2,343,657 to PlayNetwork for such services in fiscal 2003, 2002 and 2001, respectively.